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@UFC Fighters Raise $13,545 for @FisherHouseFdtn in 2014

Posted 5:01 PM
The second year of FightMetric's Strength in Numbers campaign came to a close with the end of Fight Night: Machida vs. Dollaway. We pledged $2.50 for every minute UFC fighters spent competing in the Octagon during 2014. In total, we saw 5,418 minutes, 50 seconds of Octagon time. This is a new record for the UFC and represents a 35% increase over 2013. It means that FightMetric will donate $13,545 to the Fisher House Foundation to benefit the families of wounded warriors.

Here are some notes from a year's worth of UFC fights and how they affected the charity campaign:

The longest event of the year was Fight Night: Machida vs. Mousasi on February 15. Fighters that night raised $433.83 with 10 of 12 fights going to decision and total fight time of 173 minutes, 32 seconds. It set a new record for longest event in UFC history. In fact, the three longest events in UFC history occurred in 2014, with UFC 169 and UFC 171 also breaking the 170 minute mark.

The shortest event of the year was Fight Night: Rockhold vs. Bisping, which only raised $159.63. There were no decision on the card and only one fight made it to the third round. It was all over in 63 minutes, 51 seconds.

New champion Robbie Lawler earns the honor of raising the most of any fighter. Lawler spent 88 minutes, 6 seconds in his four fights in 2014, raising $220.25 for Fisher House. Lawler's 2014 sets the modern era record for most fight time by a fighter in a single year. It's only topped by Oleg Taktarov's ridiculous 1995 when he fought nine times and lasted 107 minutes, 50 seconds.

The top three earners in 2014 were:

1. Robbie Lawler - 88 minutes, 6 seconds
2. Neil Magny - 65 minutes, 12 seconds
3. Dustin Ortiz - 60 minutes

The shortest 2014 of any UFC fighter belonged to Doo Ho Choi. He raised a paltry $0.75 for his 18 seconds of work.

Welcome to the new fightmetric.com

Posted 1:54 PM
Yesterday marked the launch of a new site design here at FightMetric. We've been working on it for quite a while, taking into the account the great suggestions we've gotten over the years from MMA fans across the world. We've added a few new things and tweaked some old things, but the upshot is that there is now more information on fightmetric.com for your enjoyment, most of it unavailable anywhere else in the world. Here are a few of the new features of the site:

Charity Tracker - As in 2013, FightMetric is continuing our Strength in Numbers program, donating money to the Fisher House Foundation for every minute UFC fighters spend competing in the Octagon. You can now follow along at the top of the homepage to see how much fight time has transpired in 2014, along with FightMetric's resulting donation to Fisher House.

Homepage Visualizations - Our homepage introduces a few new ways to display fight data. The most recent main event gets an intuitive chart that shows each fighter's significant strike totals by target and position, with the larger bars indicating the strikes that made up a greater proportion of total striking output. A quick glance shows where each fighter did their best work and how important it was to the totality of the fight. The upcoming main event gets a dashboard comparing the two fighters against each other, but also against the UFC average and the UFC record for that category.

Stat Leader Filters - Our UFC statistical leaders page now gives you the ability to filter by fighter country, weight class, and whether the fighter is active in the UFC. Want to know which Brazilian lightweight has landed the most strikes in UFC history? Now you can find out! (It's Gleison Tibau, by the way)

UFC Rankings Page - The official UFC rankings are now available on our site. We've added some extra detail, such as the results of each fighter's last three fights and the max rank they've achieved while in the UFC.

Deeper Fight Stats - We've added a bunch of new stats to every fight and some charts to help visualize the new data. Every fight now has a breakdown of significant strikes by both target and location. Now it's easier to drill into the striking data to see which fighter mixed their strikes better and who controlled the striking at distance, in the clinch, and on the ground. Check it out for Jones vs. Teixeira.

We'd love to get your feedback on the site. Please feel free to Contact Us with comments, questions, or suggestions for future improvements.

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